Annals of Colorectal Research Annals of Colorectal Research Ann Colorectal Res http://www.colorectalresearch.com 2322-5262 2322-5289 10.5812/acr. en jalali 2017 6 26 gregorian 2017 6 26 1 3
en 10.17795/acr-14952 Periumbilical Multiport Laparoscopic Appendectomy: A Preliminary Experience Using a Novel Technique Periumbilical Multiport Laparoscopic Appendectomy: A Preliminary Experience Using a Novel Technique research-article research-article Background

Single incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS) is especially developed to achieve better cosmetic results. Using the umbilicus for ports access is widely accepted in this approach.

Objectives

The aim of this study was to evaluate our initial experience with a new port access technique applied for laparoscopic appendectomy: Periumbilical Multiport Laparoscopic Appendectomy (PUMLA).

Patients and Methods

Between January 2011 and March 2013, a total of 14 appendectomies were performed using a new port access technique. Patients were selected randomly. Thirteen of these cases had acute appendicitis, and one patient had familial Mediterranean fever (FMF). During these operations, three separate curvilinear incisions were created in the periumbilical skin folds and ports were placed in these ways. The five mm port was used for a zero degree telescope. The other two were used to manipulate the laparoscopic instruments. The appendectomy was performed intracorporeally in six cases; however, in eight cases, the appendix was taken out via trocar after dissecting the mesoappendix, then the appendectomy was performed extracorporeally. Reconstruction was not needed to the umbilicus as there was no anatomical distortion.

Results

Five patients were female, and nine were male. Age range was 5 to 15 years (mean 9.7 y). Operation time was between 20 and 82 minutes (mean 43 min). We did not need to convert to standard laparoscopic appendectomy or place an additional port in any of these patients. The average postoperative hospitalization was 14.1 hours (5-33 h). No complications such as wound infection, trocar site hernia, adhesive small-bowel obstruction, or abscess were observed in the early and late postoperative period. Good cosmetic results were obtained after separate periumbilical curvilinear incision technique.

Conclusions

We found that this new port access technique is feasible, safe, and associated with good cosmetic results.

Background

Single incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS) is especially developed to achieve better cosmetic results. Using the umbilicus for ports access is widely accepted in this approach.

Objectives

The aim of this study was to evaluate our initial experience with a new port access technique applied for laparoscopic appendectomy: Periumbilical Multiport Laparoscopic Appendectomy (PUMLA).

Patients and Methods

Between January 2011 and March 2013, a total of 14 appendectomies were performed using a new port access technique. Patients were selected randomly. Thirteen of these cases had acute appendicitis, and one patient had familial Mediterranean fever (FMF). During these operations, three separate curvilinear incisions were created in the periumbilical skin folds and ports were placed in these ways. The five mm port was used for a zero degree telescope. The other two were used to manipulate the laparoscopic instruments. The appendectomy was performed intracorporeally in six cases; however, in eight cases, the appendix was taken out via trocar after dissecting the mesoappendix, then the appendectomy was performed extracorporeally. Reconstruction was not needed to the umbilicus as there was no anatomical distortion.

Results

Five patients were female, and nine were male. Age range was 5 to 15 years (mean 9.7 y). Operation time was between 20 and 82 minutes (mean 43 min). We did not need to convert to standard laparoscopic appendectomy or place an additional port in any of these patients. The average postoperative hospitalization was 14.1 hours (5-33 h). No complications such as wound infection, trocar site hernia, adhesive small-bowel obstruction, or abscess were observed in the early and late postoperative period. Good cosmetic results were obtained after separate periumbilical curvilinear incision technique.

Conclusions

We found that this new port access technique is feasible, safe, and associated with good cosmetic results.

Laparoscopy;Appendectomy;Child;Surgical Procedures, Minimally Invasive Laparoscopy;Appendectomy;Child;Surgical Procedures, Minimally Invasive 92 96 http://www.colorectalresearch.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=14952 Ibrahim Akkoyun Ibrahim Akkoyun Department of Pediatric Surgery, Dr. Faruk Sukan Maternity and Children Hospital, Konya, Turkey; Department of Pediatric Surgery, Dr. Faruk Sukan Maternity and Children Hospital, Konya, Turkey. Tel: +90-5324742886, Fax: +90-3323236723 Department of Pediatric Surgery, Dr. Faruk Sukan Maternity and Children Hospital, Konya, Turkey; Department of Pediatric Surgery, Dr. Faruk Sukan Maternity and Children Hospital, Konya, Turkey. Tel: +90-5324742886, Fax: +90-3323236723
en 10.17795/acr-13953 Primary Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue Lymphoma of the Rectum Primary Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue Lymphoma of the Rectum case-report case-report Case Presentation

Our patient was a 66 year-old man presenting with 5-6 months abdominal pain and anemia. In colonoscopy, a rectal ulcer was found and biopsy revealed MALT lymphoma. Physical examination and staging evaluations were normal. Radiotherapy was started for him but he did not tolerate radiotherapy and instead received chemotherapy. After 38 months, he is fine.

Introduction

Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma most commonly involves the stomach and its treatment is surgery, antibiotic therapy or radiotherapy. Rectal MALT is not only so rare but treatment is not as clear as gastric MALT.

Conclusions

The incidence of rectal MALT is rare and treatment is not so clear. The results on H. pylori eradication, radiotherapy and chemotherapy are more controversial.

Case Presentation

Our patient was a 66 year-old man presenting with 5-6 months abdominal pain and anemia. In colonoscopy, a rectal ulcer was found and biopsy revealed MALT lymphoma. Physical examination and staging evaluations were normal. Radiotherapy was started for him but he did not tolerate radiotherapy and instead received chemotherapy. After 38 months, he is fine.

Introduction

Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma most commonly involves the stomach and its treatment is surgery, antibiotic therapy or radiotherapy. Rectal MALT is not only so rare but treatment is not as clear as gastric MALT.

Conclusions

The incidence of rectal MALT is rare and treatment is not so clear. The results on H. pylori eradication, radiotherapy and chemotherapy are more controversial.

Rectum;Lymphoma, B-Cell, Marginal Zone;Drug Therapy;Radiotherapy Rectum;Lymphoma, B-Cell, Marginal Zone;Drug Therapy;Radiotherapy 106 110 http://www.colorectalresearch.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=13953 Shapour Omidvari Shapour Omidvari Department of Radiation Oncology, Namazi Hospital, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran Department of Radiation Oncology, Namazi Hospital, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran Hamid Nasrolahi Hamid Nasrolahi Department of Radiation Oncology, Namazi Hospital, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran; Department of Radiation Oncology, Namazi Hospital, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran. Tel: +98-7116125170, Fax: +98-7116474320 Department of Radiation Oncology, Namazi Hospital, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran; Department of Radiation Oncology, Namazi Hospital, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran. Tel: +98-7116125170, Fax: +98-7116474320 Leila MoaddabShoar Leila MoaddabShoar Department of Radiation Oncology, Namazi Hospital, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran Department of Radiation Oncology, Namazi Hospital, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran Seyed Hasan Hamedi Seyed Hasan Hamedi Department of Radiation Oncology, Namazi Hospital, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran Department of Radiation Oncology, Namazi Hospital, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran Mohammad Mohammadianpanah Mohammad Mohammadianpanah Colorectal Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran Colorectal Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran Yahya Daneshbod Yahya Daneshbod Dr Daneshbod pathology laboratory, Shiraz, IR Iran Dr Daneshbod pathology laboratory, Shiraz, IR Iran Mansour Ansari Mansour Ansari Department of Radiation Oncology, Namazi Hospital, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran Department of Radiation Oncology, Namazi Hospital, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran Niloofar Ahmadloo Niloofar Ahmadloo Department of Radiation Oncology, Namazi Hospital, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran Department of Radiation Oncology, Namazi Hospital, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran Ahmad Mosalaei Ahmad Mosalaei Shiraz Institute for Cancer Research, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran Shiraz Institute for Cancer Research, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran
en 10.17795/acr-15331 Epidemiology of Inflammatory Bowel Disease in Iran: The Distance and the Difference in the Incidence of the Diseases Are Decreasing Due to the Globalization Epidemiology of Inflammatory Bowel Disease in Iran: The Distance and the Difference in the Incidence of the Diseases Are Decreasing Due to the Globalization letter letter Epidemiology;Crohn Disease;Colitis, Ulcerative Epidemiology;Crohn Disease;Colitis, Ulcerative 114 115 http://www.colorectalresearch.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=15331 Anita Balint Anita Balint First Department of Medicine, University of Szeged, Szeged, Hungary First Department of Medicine, University of Szeged, Szeged, Hungary Klaudia Farkas Klaudia Farkas First Department of Medicine, University of Szeged, Szeged, Hungary First Department of Medicine, University of Szeged, Szeged, Hungary Renata Bor Renata Bor First Department of Medicine, University of Szeged, Szeged, Hungary First Department of Medicine, University of Szeged, Szeged, Hungary Tamas Molnar Tamas Molnar First Department of Medicine, University of Szeged, Szeged, Hungary; First Department of Medicine, University of Szeged, Szeged, Hungary. Tel: +36-62545189, Fax: +36-62545185 First Department of Medicine, University of Szeged, Szeged, Hungary; First Department of Medicine, University of Szeged, Szeged, Hungary. Tel: +36-62545189, Fax: +36-62545185
en 10.17795/acr-16264 Aspirin for the Primary Prophylaxis of Colorectal Cancer Aspirin for the Primary Prophylaxis of Colorectal Cancer review-article review-article Conclusions

Aspirin has been proposed as a chemopreventive agent in colorectal cancer (CRC) for many years, but there are still debates on the proper candidates, treatment time and cost benefit analysis of this potentially harmful drug. This brief review would try to answer these questions using the currently available evidence.

Evidence Acquisitions

In this manuscript, we reviewed the best available evidence on the prophylatic use of aspirin for colorectal cancer prevention.

Results

The analysis and large cohort studies revealed that although using ASA would probably decrease the risk of colon cancer, this would not occur before 5-8 years after treatment. ASA usage would increase the risk of major gastrointestinal bleeding.

Context

Increasing epidemic of colorectal cancer worldwide and the expenses of the current screening and treatment of this potentially fatal condition have raised the interest of in finding a primary prophylactic measure. Aspirin has been administrated for more than 40 years to achieve this.

Conclusions

Aspirin has been proposed as a chemopreventive agent in colorectal cancer (CRC) for many years, but there are still debates on the proper candidates, treatment time and cost benefit analysis of this potentially harmful drug. This brief review would try to answer these questions using the currently available evidence.

Evidence Acquisitions

In this manuscript, we reviewed the best available evidence on the prophylatic use of aspirin for colorectal cancer prevention.

Results

The analysis and large cohort studies revealed that although using ASA would probably decrease the risk of colon cancer, this would not occur before 5-8 years after treatment. ASA usage would increase the risk of major gastrointestinal bleeding.

Context

Increasing epidemic of colorectal cancer worldwide and the expenses of the current screening and treatment of this potentially fatal condition have raised the interest of in finding a primary prophylactic measure. Aspirin has been administrated for more than 40 years to achieve this.

Aspirin;Colorectal Cancer;Primary Prevention Aspirin;Colorectal Cancer;Primary Prevention 77 80 http://www.colorectalresearch.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=16264 Kamran B Lankarani Kamran B Lankarani Health Policy Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran; Health Policy Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran. Tel/Fax: +98-7112309615 Health Policy Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran; Health Policy Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran. Tel/Fax: +98-7112309615
en 10.17795/acr-15311 Prognostic Value of Total Lymph Node Identified and Ratio of Lymph Nodes in Resected Colorectal Cancer Prognostic Value of Total Lymph Node Identified and Ratio of Lymph Nodes in Resected Colorectal Cancer research-article research-article Conclusions

Total lymph nodes identified and ratio of lymph nodes are associated with oncological outcomes outcomes in patients with colorectal cancer.

Objectives

This study aimed to investigate the prognostic value of total lymph nodes identified and ratio of lymph nodes in resected colorectal cancer.

Patients and Methods

Two hundred seventy five patients with histologically proven resected locoregional invasive colorectal adenocarcinoma from 2003 to 2011 were included. All patients were treated with standard surgical resection for their colorectal cancer. Patients with incomplete data, or unresectable tumors or distant metastases were excluded from the study. All potential prognostic variables were evaluated for their impact on the local control, disease-free, and overall survival rates.

Results

Of the 275 patients, 162 were men and 113 were women with a median age of 54 (range 23-84) years. The mean total lymph nodes were significantly higher in colon cancer than rectal cancer (11 versus 7.5, P = 0.001). In node positive (stage III) patients, the mean lymph nodes ratio was 0.5 for rectal cancers and 0.37 for colon cancers respectively showing a nonsignificant (P = 0.05) trend toward higher lymph nodes ratio in rectal cancer patients. In univariate analysis, the mean total number of lymph node identified was a prognostic factor for 5-year disease free (P = 0.04) and overall survival (P = 0.02) rates. In node positive patients, lymph nodes ratio was a prognostic factor for 5-year local control (P = 0.04), disease free survival (P = 0.01), and overall survival (P = 0.01) rates. On multivariate analysis, advanced primary tumor stage, rectal primary site and the presence of perineural invasion were independent adverse prognostic factors for overall survival.

Background

The extent of lymph node involvement is the most significant prognostic indicator in resected locoregional colorectal cancer.

Conclusions

Total lymph nodes identified and ratio of lymph nodes are associated with oncological outcomes outcomes in patients with colorectal cancer.

Objectives

This study aimed to investigate the prognostic value of total lymph nodes identified and ratio of lymph nodes in resected colorectal cancer.

Patients and Methods

Two hundred seventy five patients with histologically proven resected locoregional invasive colorectal adenocarcinoma from 2003 to 2011 were included. All patients were treated with standard surgical resection for their colorectal cancer. Patients with incomplete data, or unresectable tumors or distant metastases were excluded from the study. All potential prognostic variables were evaluated for their impact on the local control, disease-free, and overall survival rates.

Results

Of the 275 patients, 162 were men and 113 were women with a median age of 54 (range 23-84) years. The mean total lymph nodes were significantly higher in colon cancer than rectal cancer (11 versus 7.5, P = 0.001). In node positive (stage III) patients, the mean lymph nodes ratio was 0.5 for rectal cancers and 0.37 for colon cancers respectively showing a nonsignificant (P = 0.05) trend toward higher lymph nodes ratio in rectal cancer patients. In univariate analysis, the mean total number of lymph node identified was a prognostic factor for 5-year disease free (P = 0.04) and overall survival (P = 0.02) rates. In node positive patients, lymph nodes ratio was a prognostic factor for 5-year local control (P = 0.04), disease free survival (P = 0.01), and overall survival (P = 0.01) rates. On multivariate analysis, advanced primary tumor stage, rectal primary site and the presence of perineural invasion were independent adverse prognostic factors for overall survival.

Background

The extent of lymph node involvement is the most significant prognostic indicator in resected locoregional colorectal cancer.

Colorectal Neoplasms;Colon;Rectum;Lymph Nodes;General Surgery;Prognosis;Survival Colorectal Neoplasms;Colon;Rectum;Lymph Nodes;General Surgery;Prognosis;Survival 81 91 http://www.colorectalresearch.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=15311 Leila Ghahramani Leila Ghahramani Colorectal Research Center, Faghihi Hospital, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran Colorectal Research Center, Faghihi Hospital, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran Leila Moaddabshoar Leila Moaddabshoar Student Research Committee, Namazi Hospital, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran Student Research Committee, Namazi Hospital, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran Samira Razzaghi Samira Razzaghi Student Research Committee, Namazi Hospital, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran Student Research Committee, Namazi Hospital, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran Sayed Hasan Hamedi Sayed Hasan Hamedi Student Research Committee, Namazi Hospital, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran Student Research Committee, Namazi Hospital, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran Saeedeh Pourahmad Saeedeh Pourahmad Biostatistics Department, School of Medicine, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran Biostatistics Department, School of Medicine, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran Mohammad Mohammadianpanah Mohammad Mohammadianpanah Colorectal Research Center, Faghihi Hospital, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran; Colorectal Research Center, Namazi Hospital, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, 71936, Shiraz, IR Iran. Tel.: +98-7116125168, Fax: +98-7116474320 Colorectal Research Center, Faghihi Hospital, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran; Colorectal Research Center, Namazi Hospital, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, 71936, Shiraz, IR Iran. Tel.: +98-7116125168, Fax: +98-7116474320
en 10.17795/acr-16139 The Effects of Human Amniotic Membrane on Healing of Colonic Anastomosis in Dogs The Effects of Human Amniotic Membrane on Healing of Colonic Anastomosis in Dogs research-article research-article Conclusions

HAM plays a positive role in healing of colonic anastomosis, and would lead to better histological outcomes compared to simple anastomosis in dogs.

Results

Modified scoring system for surgical wound healing was used to identify the grade of healing in all samples. The healing score was significantly higher in the HAM group (P = 0.01).

Materials and Methods

Eight cross-breed male dogs were divided into two equal groups. After anesthesia and exploration, 5cm of left colon was resected, and end-to-end anastomosis was performed in a single layer. In the treatment group (B), HAM patch measuring 2×3 cm was wrapped around the anastomotic line. Mann-Whitney U test was used to compare the results in the two groups due to small sample size, and normal distribution of data was examined using the kolmogorov-simirnov test (P = 0.03).

Objectives

This study was conducted to determine surgical and histological outcomes of applying human amniotic membrane (HAM) in colonic anastomosis in dogs.

Background

Anastomotic leakage is claimed to be responsible for about one third of deaths following colon surgeries. Therefore, research on applied materials that may prevent leakage and improve healing requires more attention.

Conclusions

HAM plays a positive role in healing of colonic anastomosis, and would lead to better histological outcomes compared to simple anastomosis in dogs.

Results

Modified scoring system for surgical wound healing was used to identify the grade of healing in all samples. The healing score was significantly higher in the HAM group (P = 0.01).

Materials and Methods

Eight cross-breed male dogs were divided into two equal groups. After anesthesia and exploration, 5cm of left colon was resected, and end-to-end anastomosis was performed in a single layer. In the treatment group (B), HAM patch measuring 2×3 cm was wrapped around the anastomotic line. Mann-Whitney U test was used to compare the results in the two groups due to small sample size, and normal distribution of data was examined using the kolmogorov-simirnov test (P = 0.03).

Objectives

This study was conducted to determine surgical and histological outcomes of applying human amniotic membrane (HAM) in colonic anastomosis in dogs.

Background

Anastomotic leakage is claimed to be responsible for about one third of deaths following colon surgeries. Therefore, research on applied materials that may prevent leakage and improve healing requires more attention.

Colon;Colorectal Surgery;Biologic Dressing;Biocompatible Materials Colon;Colorectal Surgery;Biologic Dressing;Biocompatible Materials 97 100 http://www.colorectalresearch.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=16139 Neda Najibpour Neda Najibpour Department of Surgery, Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz, IR Iran Department of Surgery, Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz, IR Iran Mohammad Bagher Jahantab Mohammad Bagher Jahantab Department of Surgery, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran Department of Surgery, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran Massood Hosseinzadeh Massood Hosseinzadeh Colorectal Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran Colorectal Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran Reza Roshanravan Reza Roshanravan Colorectal Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran Colorectal Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran Sam Moslemi Sam Moslemi Department of Surgery, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran Department of Surgery, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran Salar Rahimikazerooni Salar Rahimikazerooni Colorectal Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran Colorectal Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran Ali Reza Safarpour Ali Reza Safarpour Gastroenterohepatology Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran Gastroenterohepatology Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran Leila Ghahramani Leila Ghahramani Colorectal Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran Colorectal Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran Seyed Vahid Hosseini Seyed Vahid Hosseini Colorectal Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran; Colorectal Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran. Tel: +98-7112306972, Fax: +98-7112330724 Colorectal Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran; Colorectal Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran. Tel: +98-7112306972, Fax: +98-7112330724
en 10.17795/acr-12476 Cytotoxic/Proliferative Effects of Umbelliprenin on Colon Cancer Cell Lines Cytotoxic/Proliferative Effects of Umbelliprenin on Colon Cancer Cell Lines research-article research-article Conclusions

We found a moderate cytotoxic activity of umbelliprenin against invasive SW48 cells, and both cytotoxic and proliferative effects on noninvasive SW1116 cells. Therefore, using umbelliprenin as an anti-inflammatory or cytotoxic compound for patients with colon cancer should be used with care.

Results

Umbelliprenin had significant cytotoxic activity against SW48 cells at all study concentrations (except for 6.25 μM), with IC50 values of 117, 77, and 69 μM after 24, 48, and 72 h, respectively. However, it was cytotoxic against SW1116 only at higher concentrations of 100 and 200 μM (34% and 64% cell death). At lower concentrations, umbelliprenin showed a significant proliferative effect on this noninvasive cancer cell line. Our data were validated by eye and microscopic images.

Objectives

7-Prenyloxycoumarins, including umbelliprenin have been widely investigated because of their pharmacological activities. This paper shows the effect of umbelliprenin on colon cancer cell lines.

Material and Methods

In the present study, invasive SW48 and noninvasive SW1116 were treated with umbelliprenin (6.25, 12.5, 25, 50, 100, and 200 μM), and the cytotoxicity was determined using a methyl thiazolelydiphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay.

Background

Colon carcinoma growth depends on many factors such as, different organisms, and immune cells, which induce and produce inflammatory cytokines. Umbelliprenin is a naturally prenylated coumarin with anti-inflammatory activities. Its ability to induce cancer cell death has shown variation on different cancer cell lines.

Conclusions

We found a moderate cytotoxic activity of umbelliprenin against invasive SW48 cells, and both cytotoxic and proliferative effects on noninvasive SW1116 cells. Therefore, using umbelliprenin as an anti-inflammatory or cytotoxic compound for patients with colon cancer should be used with care.

Results

Umbelliprenin had significant cytotoxic activity against SW48 cells at all study concentrations (except for 6.25 μM), with IC50 values of 117, 77, and 69 μM after 24, 48, and 72 h, respectively. However, it was cytotoxic against SW1116 only at higher concentrations of 100 and 200 μM (34% and 64% cell death). At lower concentrations, umbelliprenin showed a significant proliferative effect on this noninvasive cancer cell line. Our data were validated by eye and microscopic images.

Objectives

7-Prenyloxycoumarins, including umbelliprenin have been widely investigated because of their pharmacological activities. This paper shows the effect of umbelliprenin on colon cancer cell lines.

Material and Methods

In the present study, invasive SW48 and noninvasive SW1116 were treated with umbelliprenin (6.25, 12.5, 25, 50, 100, and 200 μM), and the cytotoxicity was determined using a methyl thiazolelydiphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay.

Background

Colon carcinoma growth depends on many factors such as, different organisms, and immune cells, which induce and produce inflammatory cytokines. Umbelliprenin is a naturally prenylated coumarin with anti-inflammatory activities. Its ability to induce cancer cell death has shown variation on different cancer cell lines.

Apoptosis;Colorectal Neoplasms;Umbelliprenin Apoptosis;Colorectal Neoplasms;Umbelliprenin 101 105 http://www.colorectalresearch.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=12476 Maryam Hamidinia Maryam Hamidinia Shiraz Institute for Cancer Research, School of Medicine, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran Shiraz Institute for Cancer Research, School of Medicine, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran Mohammad Ramezani Mohammad Ramezani Department of Pharmacognosy, Faculty of pharmacy, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, IR Iran Department of Pharmacognosy, Faculty of pharmacy, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, IR Iran Zahra Mojtahedi Zahra Mojtahedi Colorectal Research Center, Faghihi Hospital, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran; Shiraz Institute for Cancer Research, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran. Tel/ Fax: +98-7112303687 Colorectal Research Center, Faghihi Hospital, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran; Shiraz Institute for Cancer Research, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran. Tel/ Fax: +98-7112303687
en 10.17795/acr-14460 Inflammatory Bowel Disease Is Frequently Encountered in Turkey and Iran but Less Than North and West Europe Inflammatory Bowel Disease Is Frequently Encountered in Turkey and Iran but Less Than North and West Europe letter letter Inflammatory Bowel Diseases;Turkey Inflammatory Bowel Diseases;Turkey 111 http://www.colorectalresearch.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=14460 Murat Kekilli Murat Kekilli Department of Gastroenterology, Corum Training and Research Hospital, Hitit University, Turkey +90-3642230300, drkekilli@gmail.com; Department of Gastroenterology, Corum Training and Research Hospital, Hitit University, Turkey +90-3642230300, drkekilli@gmail.com Department of Gastroenterology, Corum Training and Research Hospital, Hitit University, Turkey +90-3642230300, drkekilli@gmail.com; Department of Gastroenterology, Corum Training and Research Hospital, Hitit University, Turkey +90-3642230300, drkekilli@gmail.com Alpaslan Tanoglu Alpaslan Tanoglu Department of Gastroenterology, GATA Haydarpasa Training Hospital, Turkey Department of Gastroenterology, GATA Haydarpasa Training Hospital, Turkey
en 10.17795/acr-14299 Commentary on: The Effect of Oral Psyllium Herbal Laxative Powder in Prevention of Hemorrhoids and Anal Fissure during Pregnancy, a Randomized Double Blind Clinical Trial Commentary on: The Effect of Oral Psyllium Herbal Laxative Powder in Prevention of Hemorrhoids and Anal Fissure during Pregnancy, a Randomized Double Blind Clinical Trial letter letter Psyllium;Constipation;Haemorrhoids Psyllium;Constipation;Haemorrhoids 112 113 http://www.colorectalresearch.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=14299 Buddhike Sri Harsha Indrasena Buddhike Sri Harsha Indrasena Department of Surgery, Teaching Hospital Batticaloa, Batticaloa, Sri Lanka; Department of Surgery, Teaching Hospital Batticaloa, Batticaloa, Sri Lanka. Tel: +94-718713457, Fax: +94-652222641 Department of Surgery, Teaching Hospital Batticaloa, Batticaloa, Sri Lanka; Department of Surgery, Teaching Hospital Batticaloa, Batticaloa, Sri Lanka. Tel: +94-718713457, Fax: +94-652222641