Annals of Colorectal Research Annals of Colorectal Research Ann Colorectal Res http://www.colorectalresearch.com 2322-5262 2322-5289 10.5812/acr. en jalali 2017 6 23 gregorian 2017 6 23 4 2
en 10.17795/acr-39633 Letter to Editor Concerning the Article “Use of General Surgery and Urology Online Modules in Medical Education” Letter to Editor Concerning the Article “Use of General Surgery and Urology Online Modules in Medical Education” letter letter General Surgery;General Surgery;General Surgery;Medical Education General Surgery;General Surgery;General Surgery;Medical Education http://www.colorectalresearch.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=39633 Manoosh Mehrabi Manoosh Mehrabi Center of Excellence for E-Learning, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran; Center of Excellence for E-Learning, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran. Tel: +98-7132300037 Center of Excellence for E-Learning, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran; Center of Excellence for E-Learning, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran. Tel: +98-7132300037
en 10.17795/acr-35527 Mobile Right Colon Syndrome: Obscure Cause of Lower Right Abdominal Pain Mobile Right Colon Syndrome: Obscure Cause of Lower Right Abdominal Pain review-article review-article Conclusions

The mobile colon syndrome should be considered in the differential diagnosis of right lower quadrant pain from obscure causes. A proper detailed history is a must to consider this as differential diagnosis. Laparoscopy offers diagnostic and therapeutic treatment. Colopexy provides dramatic relief in carefully selected patients.

Context

The mobile right colon is a developmental aberration. During the development and rotation of the gut, the cecum and ascending colon are the last to take their final position and fuse with the posterior abdominal wall.

Evidence Acquisition

Though a mobile right colon may be present in 20% - 30% of the population but causes symptoms in very few. The patients present intermittent colicky right lower quadrant abdominal pain with associated abdominal distention and symptomatic relief after passing flatus or having a bowel movement.

Results

Non fixation along with heavy load of the right colon drags the cecum and ascending colon down and leads to stasis, obstruction or volvulus. The diagnosis of this entity is very difficult as radiological studies are not conclusive.

Conclusions

The mobile colon syndrome should be considered in the differential diagnosis of right lower quadrant pain from obscure causes. A proper detailed history is a must to consider this as differential diagnosis. Laparoscopy offers diagnostic and therapeutic treatment. Colopexy provides dramatic relief in carefully selected patients.

Context

The mobile right colon is a developmental aberration. During the development and rotation of the gut, the cecum and ascending colon are the last to take their final position and fuse with the posterior abdominal wall.

Evidence Acquisition

Though a mobile right colon may be present in 20% - 30% of the population but causes symptoms in very few. The patients present intermittent colicky right lower quadrant abdominal pain with associated abdominal distention and symptomatic relief after passing flatus or having a bowel movement.

Results

Non fixation along with heavy load of the right colon drags the cecum and ascending colon down and leads to stasis, obstruction or volvulus. The diagnosis of this entity is very difficult as radiological studies are not conclusive.

Mobile Right Colon;Stasis;Obstruction;Colopexy Mobile Right Colon;Stasis;Obstruction;Colopexy http://www.colorectalresearch.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=35527 Lovenish Bains Lovenish Bains Institute-Department of Surgery, Dr BSA Medical College and Hospital, New Delhi, India; Institute-Department of Surgery, Dr BSA Medical College and Hospital, New Delhi, India. Tel: +91-9910777700 Institute-Department of Surgery, Dr BSA Medical College and Hospital, New Delhi, India; Institute-Department of Surgery, Dr BSA Medical College and Hospital, New Delhi, India. Tel: +91-9910777700 Amit Gupta Amit Gupta Institute-Department of Surgery, Dr BSA Medical College and Hospital, New Delhi, India Institute-Department of Surgery, Dr BSA Medical College and Hospital, New Delhi, India Daljit Kaur Daljit Kaur Institute-Max Super Speciality Hospital, Dehradun, India Institute-Max Super Speciality Hospital, Dehradun, India Aman Batish Aman Batish Institute-Department of Surgery, Maulana Azad Medical College, New Delhi, India Institute-Department of Surgery, Maulana Azad Medical College, New Delhi, India
en 10.17795/acr-32715 Colorectal Cancer in Octogenarians: Results of Treatment, a Descriptive Clinical Study Colorectal Cancer in Octogenarians: Results of Treatment, a Descriptive Clinical Study research-article research-article Conclusions

The co-morbidity score is important in survival after surgery. Forty-four percent of octogenarians with CRC died because of non-tumor-related disease or illness. Fit elderly people can benefit from standard therapy for CRC.

Background

Colorectal cancers (CRCs) often occur in octogenarians. However, data on treatment and survival are sparse.

Objectives

Octogenarians were studied in order to gain data on treatment, outcomes, and survival related to CRC.

Patients and Methods

All consecutive octogenarians with CRC in the period of 2002 - 2008 were included. An extensive review of hospital records was carried out. Patients were divided into two groups, as follows: group 1 included patients who were alive after five years of follow-up, while group 2 comprised patients who died within 5 years of their diagnosis. Cause of death was determined and classified as related to cancer, non-related, or because of treatment.

Results

One hundred and eleven octogenarians were diagnosed with CRC (82 colon cancers and 29 rectal cancers). Patients in group 2 had a significantly higher disease stage compared with group 1 (P < 0.001). Patients in group 1 more often underwent surgery with curative intent (P < 0.0001). There was no difference in clinical presentation or localization of the malignancy. In group 1, 14 patients died more than 5 years after surgery. The cause of death was not related to cancer in 100% of cases. In group 2, 29 (46.0%) died as a direct consequence of CRC, 14 (22.2%) due to the treatment, and 20 (31.7%) died due to non-cancer-related causes. The overall 5-year survival rate was 40% in colon cancer patients and 51.7% in rectal cancer patients. The Charlson age co-morbidity scores were significantly lower in colon cancer patients in group 1 (P = 0.005). This was not the case in patients with rectal cancer.

Conclusions

The co-morbidity score is important in survival after surgery. Forty-four percent of octogenarians with CRC died because of non-tumor-related disease or illness. Fit elderly people can benefit from standard therapy for CRC.

Background

Colorectal cancers (CRCs) often occur in octogenarians. However, data on treatment and survival are sparse.

Objectives

Octogenarians were studied in order to gain data on treatment, outcomes, and survival related to CRC.

Patients and Methods

All consecutive octogenarians with CRC in the period of 2002 - 2008 were included. An extensive review of hospital records was carried out. Patients were divided into two groups, as follows: group 1 included patients who were alive after five years of follow-up, while group 2 comprised patients who died within 5 years of their diagnosis. Cause of death was determined and classified as related to cancer, non-related, or because of treatment.

Results

One hundred and eleven octogenarians were diagnosed with CRC (82 colon cancers and 29 rectal cancers). Patients in group 2 had a significantly higher disease stage compared with group 1 (P < 0.001). Patients in group 1 more often underwent surgery with curative intent (P < 0.0001). There was no difference in clinical presentation or localization of the malignancy. In group 1, 14 patients died more than 5 years after surgery. The cause of death was not related to cancer in 100% of cases. In group 2, 29 (46.0%) died as a direct consequence of CRC, 14 (22.2%) due to the treatment, and 20 (31.7%) died due to non-cancer-related causes. The overall 5-year survival rate was 40% in colon cancer patients and 51.7% in rectal cancer patients. The Charlson age co-morbidity scores were significantly lower in colon cancer patients in group 1 (P = 0.005). This was not the case in patients with rectal cancer.

Octogenarians;Colorectal Cancer;Epidemiology;Survival;Recurrence Octogenarians;Colorectal Cancer;Epidemiology;Survival;Recurrence http://www.colorectalresearch.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=32715 Elmer van Eeghen Elmer van Eeghen Department of Internal Medicine, Zaans Medisch Centrum, Zaandam, The Netherlands Department of Internal Medicine, Zaans Medisch Centrum, Zaandam, The Netherlands Sandra D. Bakker Sandra D. Bakker Department of Internal Medicine, Zaans Medisch Centrum, Zaandam, The Netherlands Department of Internal Medicine, Zaans Medisch Centrum, Zaandam, The Netherlands Ruud J.L.F Loffeld Ruud J.L.F Loffeld Department of Internal Medicine, Zaans Medisch Centrum, Zaandam, The Netherlands; Department of Internal Medicine, Zaans Medisch Centrum, Zaandam, The Netherlands. Tel: +31-756502779, Fax: +31-756502379 Department of Internal Medicine, Zaans Medisch Centrum, Zaandam, The Netherlands; Department of Internal Medicine, Zaans Medisch Centrum, Zaandam, The Netherlands. Tel: +31-756502779, Fax: +31-756502379
en 10.17795/acr-36712 Comparison of Preoperative Ultrasonography and Pathology Results of Patients Undergoing Appendectomy Comparison of Preoperative Ultrasonography and Pathology Results of Patients Undergoing Appendectomy research-article research-article Background

It is still difficult to make the diagnosis of acute appendicitis in children with only clinical examination.

Objectives

The present study, retrospectively reviewing the data of the patients that underwent appendectomy, aimed at emphasizing the diagnostic value of ultrasonography findings by comparing them with pathological diagnosis.

Patients and Methods

This retrospective study included patients aged under 18, who were operated on for appendicitis between 1 January 2015 and 31 December 2015. The relationship between the pathology results of these patients and the results of preoperative ultrasonography performed for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis was investigated.

Results

The study included 100 patients, 42 were female and 58 were male, on whom ultrasonography was performed and whose mean age was 11.3 ± 3.7 years. While there were 28 (28%) patients who did not receive a definitive diagnosis of appendicitis pathologically, there were 43 (43%) patients in whom there were no ultrasonography findings supporting appendicitis. While appendicitis diagnosis was made pathologically in 72 patients (72%), suggestive findings of appendicitis, such as compression and double wall thickness of the appendix (over 6 mm), were detected in 57 patients (57%). In addition, 42% periappendiceal fluid collection, 25% periappendiceal fat inflammation, and 14% appendicolith were detected by ultrasonography. While 47 (65.3%) of the 72 patients with pathologically confirmed appendicitis received appendicitis diagnosis by ultrasonography, 25 (34.7%) did not (Pearson square test P = 0.007). The sensitivity and specificity of ultrasonography in the diagnosis of appendicitis were 66.6% (48/72) and 64.28% (18/28), respectively.

Conclusions

According to the results of the current study, ultrasonography, in the diagnosis of appendicitis, should only be used for the support of clinical diagnosis or for differential diagnosis.

Background

It is still difficult to make the diagnosis of acute appendicitis in children with only clinical examination.

Objectives

The present study, retrospectively reviewing the data of the patients that underwent appendectomy, aimed at emphasizing the diagnostic value of ultrasonography findings by comparing them with pathological diagnosis.

Patients and Methods

This retrospective study included patients aged under 18, who were operated on for appendicitis between 1 January 2015 and 31 December 2015. The relationship between the pathology results of these patients and the results of preoperative ultrasonography performed for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis was investigated.

Results

The study included 100 patients, 42 were female and 58 were male, on whom ultrasonography was performed and whose mean age was 11.3 ± 3.7 years. While there were 28 (28%) patients who did not receive a definitive diagnosis of appendicitis pathologically, there were 43 (43%) patients in whom there were no ultrasonography findings supporting appendicitis. While appendicitis diagnosis was made pathologically in 72 patients (72%), suggestive findings of appendicitis, such as compression and double wall thickness of the appendix (over 6 mm), were detected in 57 patients (57%). In addition, 42% periappendiceal fluid collection, 25% periappendiceal fat inflammation, and 14% appendicolith were detected by ultrasonography. While 47 (65.3%) of the 72 patients with pathologically confirmed appendicitis received appendicitis diagnosis by ultrasonography, 25 (34.7%) did not (Pearson square test P = 0.007). The sensitivity and specificity of ultrasonography in the diagnosis of appendicitis were 66.6% (48/72) and 64.28% (18/28), respectively.

Conclusions

According to the results of the current study, ultrasonography, in the diagnosis of appendicitis, should only be used for the support of clinical diagnosis or for differential diagnosis.

Ultrasonography;Appendicitis;Diagnosis;Children Ultrasonography;Appendicitis;Diagnosis;Children http://www.colorectalresearch.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=36712 Ramazan Karabulut Ramazan Karabulut Departments of Pediatric Surgery, Gazi University, Faculty of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey; Departments of Pediatric Surgery, Gazi University, Faculty of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey. Tel: +90-3122026210, Fax: +90-3122230528 Departments of Pediatric Surgery, Gazi University, Faculty of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey; Departments of Pediatric Surgery, Gazi University, Faculty of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey. Tel: +90-3122026210, Fax: +90-3122230528 Zafer Turkyilmaz Zafer Turkyilmaz Departments of Pediatric Surgery, Gazi University, Faculty of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey Departments of Pediatric Surgery, Gazi University, Faculty of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey Kaan Sonmez Kaan Sonmez Departments of Pediatric Surgery, Gazi University, Faculty of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey Departments of Pediatric Surgery, Gazi University, Faculty of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey Kıvanc Seref Kıvanc Seref Departments of Pediatric Surgery, Gazi University, Faculty of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey Departments of Pediatric Surgery, Gazi University, Faculty of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey Aylar Poyraz Aylar Poyraz Departments of Pathology, Gazi University Faculty of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey Departments of Pathology, Gazi University Faculty of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey Suna Ozhan Oktar Suna Ozhan Oktar Departments of Radiology, Gazi University Faculty of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey Departments of Radiology, Gazi University Faculty of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey Abdullah Can Basaklar Abdullah Can Basaklar Departments of Pediatric Surgery, Gazi University, Faculty of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey Departments of Pediatric Surgery, Gazi University, Faculty of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey
en 10.17795/acr-37285 Oral Grapeseed Oil and Sesame Oil in Experimental Acetic Acid-Induced Ulcerative Colitis in Rat Oral Grapeseed Oil and Sesame Oil in Experimental Acetic Acid-Induced Ulcerative Colitis in Rat research-article research-article Conclusions

GSO in combination with SO may be considered as the treatment of choice for UC based on antioxidant and histopathological evaluations.

Objectives

The current study aimed to evaluate the effects of sesame oil (SO) and grapeseed oil (GSO) on acetic acid-induced UC in rats.

Materials and Methods

Eighty male rats were divided into eight groups as health control (HC1), received normal saline; HC2, received SO; HC3, received GSO; negative control (NC), UC and normal saline; positive control (PC), UC and mesalamine; SO, UC and SO; GSO, UC and GSO, and SO + GSO. The daily weight changes, serum levels of oxidative stress markers and lipid profile plus colon macroscopic and microscopic histological changes were measured at the end of the seventh day.

Results

Significant differences were detected between HC1 and PC on the 3rd (P = 0.002), 4th (0.013) and 6th days (0.014) and between HC1 and NC on the 4th day (0.027) in weight of rats. Use of GSO alone or in combination with SO decreased the extent of the changes both in macroscopic and microscopic indices and also at the inflammation level. The most significant decrease in the MDA level and the most obvious increase in the TAC belonged to the GSO group in comparison to the NC group. The lowest cholesterol (51.43 ± 5.62 mg/dL) and HDL levels (29.29 ± 6.24 mg/dL) were detected in response to SO consumption in comparison to NC group (P = 0.030 and P = 0.257, respectively).

Background

Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a multi-factorial disease with unknown etiology and has many clinical manifestations.

Conclusions

GSO in combination with SO may be considered as the treatment of choice for UC based on antioxidant and histopathological evaluations.

Objectives

The current study aimed to evaluate the effects of sesame oil (SO) and grapeseed oil (GSO) on acetic acid-induced UC in rats.

Materials and Methods

Eighty male rats were divided into eight groups as health control (HC1), received normal saline; HC2, received SO; HC3, received GSO; negative control (NC), UC and normal saline; positive control (PC), UC and mesalamine; SO, UC and SO; GSO, UC and GSO, and SO + GSO. The daily weight changes, serum levels of oxidative stress markers and lipid profile plus colon macroscopic and microscopic histological changes were measured at the end of the seventh day.

Results

Significant differences were detected between HC1 and PC on the 3rd (P = 0.002), 4th (0.013) and 6th days (0.014) and between HC1 and NC on the 4th day (0.027) in weight of rats. Use of GSO alone or in combination with SO decreased the extent of the changes both in macroscopic and microscopic indices and also at the inflammation level. The most significant decrease in the MDA level and the most obvious increase in the TAC belonged to the GSO group in comparison to the NC group. The lowest cholesterol (51.43 ± 5.62 mg/dL) and HDL levels (29.29 ± 6.24 mg/dL) were detected in response to SO consumption in comparison to NC group (P = 0.030 and P = 0.257, respectively).

Background

Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a multi-factorial disease with unknown etiology and has many clinical manifestations.

Grapeseed Oil;Sesame Oil;Ulcerative Colitis;Oxidative Stress;Histopathology Grapeseed Oil;Sesame Oil;Ulcerative Colitis;Oxidative Stress;Histopathology http://www.colorectalresearch.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=37285 Fatemeh Hosseinzadeh Fatemeh Hosseinzadeh Department of Clinical Nutrition, School of Nutrition and Food Sciences, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran; Nutrition and Food Sciences Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran Department of Clinical Nutrition, School of Nutrition and Food Sciences, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran; Nutrition and Food Sciences Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran Nader Tanideh Nader Tanideh Transgenic Technology Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran; Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran; Transgenic Technology Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran Transgenic Technology Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran; Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran; Transgenic Technology Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran Negar Azarpira Negar Azarpira Transplantation Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran Transplantation Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran Azadeh Sayarifard Azadeh Sayarifard Center for Academic and Health Policy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Center for Academic and Health Policy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Masood Sepehrimanesh Masood Sepehrimanesh Gastroenterohepatology Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran Gastroenterohepatology Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran Moosa Salehi Moosa Salehi Department of Clinical Nutrition, School of Nutrition and Food Sciences, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran; Nutrition and Food Sciences Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran; Department of Clinical Nutrition, School of Nutrition and Food Sciences, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran Department of Clinical Nutrition, School of Nutrition and Food Sciences, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran; Nutrition and Food Sciences Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran; Department of Clinical Nutrition, School of Nutrition and Food Sciences, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran